Posts Tagged Office 2010

Office 2010 – Deployment Options

As Office 2010 gets nearer RTM (another phase of releases went out the other day to TAP customers) many of us need to begin to think about how we’re going to deploy it.  Good news is that Microsoft has taken the thought out of the what’s and how’s and put it all together for us in a simple document.  Even better, they’ve given us three options – a PDF, an XPS or even a Visio (what the PDF and XPS were made from, no doubt).

In short, there are five ways to deploy Office 2010:

As with anything, each has its advantages and disadvantages, all outlined for you and downloadable from here:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=85607061-5eb2-4659-afc5-5d942b84a024&displaylang=en

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Deploying Office 2010 with Presentation Virtualisation (a.k.a. Terminal Services)

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(Source: Deployment Options for Microsoft Office 2010)

Overview

Administrators can use Windows Server® 2008 Terminal Services as a deployment option to allow users to operate the Office 2010 applications from their workstations. Terminal Services is run on a shared server and presents the application user interface on a remote system, such as a local workstation. Using Terminal Services to take advantage of App-V enables the optimization of the application through the sequencing process of application virtualization and then uses Terminal Services to deliver the application as a presentation virtualization.

Advantages
  • Centralizes management of applications, such as controlling application usage and license metering, which can help administrators ensure compliance.
  • Supports end-user roaming experience and to quickly make applications available to end-users.
  • Provides thin-client support.
  • Reduces network traffic because only keyboard, mouse, and display information is transmitted.
Limitations
  • Application availability is dependent on both the network infrastructure and the servers running the application.
  • Graphic-intensive applications might experience degradation in performance.
  • Less flexibility of traditional end-user experience on a workstation.
Recommendations
  • Presentation virtualization is a good solution if application compatibility, such as running multiple versions of Office, is required and you want to use the processing power of servers running Terminal Services to operate the applications.
  • When older workstations do not support the operating system,  presentation virtualization is a good solution.
  • Ensure that redundancy is in place for presentation virtualization infrastructure to avoid having a single point of failure.
Deployment Help & Tools

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Deploying Office 2010 Using Application Virtualisation (App-V)

image (Source: Deployment Options for Microsoft Office 2010)

Overview

Administrators can use Microsoft Application Virtualization (App-V) as part of a deployment option to allow users to run Office 2010 applications on their workstations. App-V streams applications on demand to the workstation, from which the application is run. However, the application is not installed on the workstation.

Advantages
  • Centralizes management of applications, such as controlling application usage and license metering, which can help administrators ensure compliance.
  • Supports end-user roaming experience and provides applications to end users quickly.
  • Allows multiple versions of Office to run on the workstation and can run both virtual applications and installed applications.
  • Office 2010 runs in an isolated virtual environment, which can enable previously incompatible applications to run on the same workstation.
  • Uses available workstation processing power to run applications.
Limitations
  • Requires supporting infrastructure and resources for App-V, which will vary depending on the infrastructure deployment option selection.
  • Network bandwidth availability for streaming application to end-user device.
  • Integration into existing infrastructure, such as patch management process.
Recommendations
  • When application compatibility, such as running multiple versions of Office 2010, is required and you want to use the processing power of the workstation to run the applications, then application virtualization is a good solution.
  • When you want to use the existing processing power of the workstation to run the application, then application virtualization is a good solution, as opposed to the use of presentation virtualization, where the running of the application takes place on the servers.
  • When scalability is needed for the distribution of the virtualized application to many hundreds of computers and in different locations, such as remote offices, we recommend  use of change and configuration management software, such as Microsoft
  • System Center Configuration Manager, as the delivery mechanism.
    Ensure that redundancy is in place for application virtualization infrastructure to avoid having a single point of failure.
Deployment Help & Tools

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Deploying Office 2010 with Manageability Tools

image (Source: Deployment Options for Microsoft Office 2010)

Overview

Administrators can use change and configuration management software, such as Microsoft System Center Essentials and Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager, to deploy Office 2010 applications. The choice of System Center Essentials or Configuration Manager depends in part on the size of your organization.

Advantages
  • Applications are deployed to thousands of workstations in a short period of time. Managed deployment systems can first push the installation bits to the targeted workstations over a specified period of time (such as over a week), which helps distribute the load to the network and allows for a quick deployment once the installation bits are on the targeted workstations.
  • Makes network bandwidth management easier.
  • Centralizes control, monitoring, reporting, and issue resolution of deployment.
  • Reduces the need of sending helpdesk personnel to workstations for troubleshooting.
Limitations
  • Requires supporting infrastructure.
  • Expertise is required to manage the change and configuration management software.
Recommendations
  • Use managed deployment systems when applications are deployed to thousands of workstations in a short period of time.
  • Put change and configuration management policies in place.
  • Plan, test, and validate before rolling out to production.
  • Roll out in a phased manner. This is especially true for unattended installs — the most common issue is people not creating/configuring a valid unattended install experience.
  • Schedule deployments for minimum network utilization times, such as evenings and weekends.
Deployment Help &Tools

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Deploying Office 2010 via Group Policy & Scripts

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(Source: Deployment Options for Microsoft Office 2010)

Overview

Administrators can use Group Policy to assign computer startup scripts to deploy Office 2010. A script can be written in any language that is supported by the client computer. Windows Script Host-supported languages, such as VBScript and JScript, and command files are the most common.

Advantages
  • Leverages Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) and Group Policy infrastructure.
    AD DS handles the elevation of privileges required for application installation.
    Administrators can use a similar scripting process to apply security updates and service packs for each computer in the domain or organizational unit.
    A script can be written in any language that is supported by the client computer, such as VBScript and JScript, which are Windows Script Host-supported languages.
Limitations
  • The product installation is not managed in the same way as Group Policy Software Installation (GPSI).
  • Group Policy invokes the script and has limited awareness of the installation state thereafter.
  • Product uninstalls and installs for multiple computers have to be done by using a command-line script or batch file.
  • It might be difficult to determine exactly which updates and service packs were applied for each client computer.
Recommendations

Group Policy startup scripts is a solution for organizations that do not have a desktop management application, such as Microsoft System Center Essentials or System Center Configuration Manager, but that need an automated way to deploy Office 2010 to many computers.

Deployment Help &Tools

Group Policy Management Console (GPMC)
Scripting languages, such as Microsoft Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript) and JScript
Sample Group Policy Startup Script
Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit

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Deploying Office 2010 from a Network Share

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(Source: Deployment Options for Microsoft Office 2010)

Overview

A simple way to deploy Office 2010 is to create a network installation point and copy the contents of the Office CD onto the network share. Make sure that the network is accessible by the targeted resources (users/computers).

Advantages
  • Easier for smaller IT departments to implement
    Network share and network access are the only infrastructure requirements.
    Flexibility — allows users to initiate the installation on an as-needed basis.
Limitations
  • Difficult to control and monitor who installs Office
    Difficult to manage installation times by end users and consequent affects on network infrastructure.
Recommendations

Using network file and folder sharing for installing Office 2010 can be a good alternative for smaller organizations that lack supporting infrastructure such as Microsoft System Center Essentials, Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), or available technical knowledge, such as scripting.

Deployment Help & Tools

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Technology in Schools…Be the big dog, don’t get chased off the porch…

ms_bett_polariod Anyone who knows technology in schools has heard of BETT.  It’s tagged as:

BETT is the world’s largest educational technology event. Use this site to find products and suppliers, and discover the latest ways to use technology for teaching and learning.

and this year, with all of the latest technology being released in October and other new stuff on it’s way in, should be no different.  Let’s have a look at some of the stuff that’s actually on offer there in London…

  • Kathryn Furness from Monkseaton will be talking about how they use OneNote to aid collaborative learning
  • Alex Pearce, who used to be ICT manager at Great Barr School, is going to show us some of things he’s found in the beta version of SharePoint 2010
  • Simon Brennand, from Philip Morant School in Essex, is going to talk about Windows 7 and share some of things he’s learnt while using it
  • Mike Herrity, from Twynham School in Dorset, is going tell stories too – about how they’ve created a Learning Gateway that’s doing everything from connecting parents to easing the KS4 Options process
  • Guy Shearer, Principal from Lodge Park Technology College, will be talking about their choice to use Live@edu for their students – to reduce the cost of their email service, as well as enhancing the collaboration options available to staff and students.

So, let’s look at that from a business perspective…Office 2010 on showcase, Windows 7 in action and schools taking it up, BPOS (live@edu) in practice….  That’s definitely a conference I wouldn’t mind visiting…More info can be found over on Microsoft’s UK School’s Learning blog:

http://blogs.msdn.com/ukschools/archive/2010/01/11/planning-your-days-at-bett-2010-the-microsoft-theatre-schedule.aspx

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Office 2010 – Test it for yourself

Logo_MSFTOffice2010_187x54

A lot of people tried the Tech Preview of Office 2010 and liked it.  However, you needed to be on a list to get the invite to the TP.  Well, I’m happy to announce – just like Windows 7 – the beta of Office 2010 is PUBLIC!! Even better yet, you get more tools than you did with the Tech Preview…So without further adieu here are some links that will be helpful in making you help us make Office 2010 just as good as Windows 7!

Office 2010’s Jumping Page – http://www.microsoft.com/office/2010/en/default.aspx

Office 2010 Professional Plus Download (64 bit) – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=600c2142-abc3-4fea-9271-0c326c45dc8f 
*NOTE: There are 32 and 64 bit versions available to run on both architectures, however strangely enough on the website it says “we recommend 32-bit which runs great on both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows”…?

Office 2010 Pro Plus (32 bit) – http://www.microsoft.com/office/2010/en/download-office-professional-plus/default.aspx

Visio 2010 Download (64 bit) – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=90573fc9-25ab-42bb-a922-c2aca21ac094

Visio 2010 Download (32 bit) – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=c2163171-4172-4d0a-9f14-2e6da16c027f&displaylang=en

Visio 2010 Viewer (both x86 and x64) – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=f9ed50b0-c7df-4fb8-89f8-db2932e624f7

Project 2010 Beta Download (32 bit) – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=3b5f07ce-020a-4800-885e-cb621f21435b

Project 2010 Beta Download (64 bit) – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=c16b7d16-3fec-4cf4-b72e-18e317ca68a5

SharePoint Foundation Server 2010 (formerly known as WSS) – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=906c9f5a-6505-4eba-bf24-95e423ac1703

SharePoint Enterprise Server 2010 – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=77c30c6c-47fc-416d-88e7-8122534b3f37

SharePoint Designer (64 bit) = http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=eeda9ab1-ac53-4870-9e1c-38940343d677

SharePoint Designer (32 bit) = http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=82df15bd-16a5-460e-a7c4-22599c669bb1&displaylang=en

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